Carry a notebook with you and use that train journey or the five minutes at work when you're drinking coffee to play around with words.
Leodegraunce:  Rebecca, please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Rebecca L. Brown: Well, I'm a British writer based in South Wales where I live with my partner and our two cats. I'm also a photographer, an artist, a businesswoman and a retired archaeologist.

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Rebecca L. Brown: I've been writing flash fiction ever since I started writing! That would have been . . . oooh . . .  fourteen years ago. I'd write very short stories for my friends at school or for family members. I love the way flash fiction forces you to think more carefully about the words you use and how you use them. You can't waste space. It keeps your writing sharp.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Rebecca L. Brown: Recently, I've been spending a lot of time working on my Blood Cravings e-book series. The first book, Fever in the Blood is now available on Amazon.com, and I'm working on a second now.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for the remainder of 2012?

Rebecca L. Brown: Like I say, I'll be focusing on the Blood Cravings series for a little while. I'm sure I'll find time for a few flash pieces too, though, so don't worry!

Leodegrance:  What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Rebecca L. Brown: Keep writing - wherever you are. Carry a notebook with you and use that train journey or the five minutes at work when you're drinking coffee to play around with words. You never know what you might come up with!

 
 
Pay attention to submission guidelines and manuscript formats. You’ve worked too hard on your story to have it be thrown away for something trivial.
Leodegraunce: Amy, please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Amy Corina: I'm a recent college graduate with an interest in writing that stretches all the way back as far as I can remember. Most of my early work was prominently featured on the refrigerator door until we professionally parted ways around high school. When I'm not working or doing various weather dances to ensure the Northeast will be good to me this winter I try to write -- something, anything, ideally finishing what I started last time.

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Amy Corina: I’ve been dabbling in flash fiction for a little under a year now. Writing a story that is as compelling as it is brief presents a unique challenge that I was eager to tackle. As a reader, I love it when authors are a little vague and allow me to use my imagination to fill in the gaps, so that’s something I try to keep in mind when I write.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Amy Corina: Leodegraunce is home to my first piece of true, blue published work, but I’m planning on allowing a few more of my flash fiction works to cross the bridge from ‘file on my desktop’ to print.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for the remainder of 2012?

Amy Corina: For the rest of the year I'll be spending my time alternating between some upcoming flash fiction and the first draft of a novel I am trying quite desperately to shelf until it isn't so fresh in my mind.

Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Amy Corina: The devil is in the details. Pay attention to submission guidelines and manuscript formats. You’ve worked too hard on your story to have it be thrown away for something trivial.

 
 
Be 80% reporter, 15% craftsman and 5% punk. Matt McGee

Leodegraunce: Please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Matt McGee: I was born in Upstate New York and raised in Southern California during the Spicoli Generation. I write fiction and poetry, play a dirty electric I built from broken guitars and drive a car from 1968 that’s amazingly reliable.
 
Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Matt McGee: It’s basically poetry in paragraph form. I discovered it in Denver in 1996 at a new bookstore called Barnes & Noble. They had a collection, ‘Sudden Fiction’ and I read it over and over while living in the hills.
 
Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Matt McGee: “The Siren Diaries,” a collection of poetry about people who work in, own, manage and patronize strip clubs.
 
Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for the remainder of 2012?

Matt McGee: “Secondhand Smoke,” a short story about a young man who buys his older girlfriend a used desk from a porn distributor.
 
Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?
 
Matt McGee: Get a job. Be among the public every day and let their lives present the stories that the world needs to hear. Be 80% reporter, 15% craftsman and 5% punk. And forget Chuck Norris: it’s all about Bob Dylan. He can do anything. Except use real syllables.

 
 
Build up a community of authors and/or readers. It sometimes takes a few minds to get a story headed in the right direction. Shad Hopson

Leodegraunce: Shad, please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.
   
Shad Hopson: I have a background in Fencing, Physics, Art, Art Conservation and Writing. I've worked in those disciplines in that order, but continue to enjoy them all.

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?
      
Shad Hopson: College was an illuminating time and flash fiction was one of the ideas it illuminated best. A fiction writing course I took made me love the style of flash.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?
      
Shad Hopson: I've been writing speculative pieces of a variety of lengths and trading editing help with fellow artists and writers. Keep an eye out for more stories, they’ll be coming soon.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for the remainder of 2012?

Shad Hopson: The rest of this year will involve writing, editing and sending my work to lovely places like this to be enjoyed.

Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Shad Hopson: Build up a community of authors and/or readers. It sometimes takes a few minds to get a story headed in the right direction.


 
 
Set aside twenty minutes a day for writing. It can be more, of course, and usually you will end up writing for longer. Treat it like a job. Caitlin Barasch

Leodegraunce: Caitlin, please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Caitlin Barasch: I'm a sophomore at Colorado College, originally from New York. I've been writing for as long as I can remember; I grew up in a creative home with singers, actors, and writers, so I like to think that we all fill our little creative niche! Writing wise, I've participated in several writing workshops and classes throughout my high school & college years. When I'm not writing, you can find me reading, riding my horse, playing soccer or tennis, or eating Peanut Butter Cup ice cream straight from the carton (oops!).

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Caitlin Barasch: A few years ago, I was in a writing workshop where we were asked to write a few six word memoirs. I thought that was so fun—choosing just the right six words to create a comprehensive story. For a while, I became quite obsessed with them; I would write them at random hours of the day when inspiration would strike. Eventually, though, I wanted to continue with a different form of short, short story—flash fiction! It holds you to almost the same standards as the six-word memoir—choosing words carefully while still making sure it is something that will leave a reader feeling satisfied at the end, feeling as if they were familiar with what went on. I would say I've been writing flash for about three years now, though I've been experimenting with it off and on throughout my life.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Caitlin Barasch: As I'm still quite young, I don't yet have a list of too many places where I've been published. I'm just starting to get my work out there. Recently, however, I had a humorous article about aspects of my romantic history published on the website Thought Catalog. It was entitled "I Don't Know How to Play Hard to Get: A Brief History of Failed Hook-Ups." Admittedly, I did use a  pen name for that one considering the people mentioned in my article are real people! During my senior year of high school, I was chosen by the staff of my town's newspaper, The Lewisboro Ledger, to contribute to a weekly column entitled "School of Thought," where I reflected on events in my life that I hoped other teens could relate to. It was a fun job!

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for the remainder of 2012?

Caitlin Barasch: Colorado College, where I attend school, has a unique curriculum called the Block Plan. It allows students to take only one class at a time in an intensive and immersive atmosphere for 3  and a half weeks, 3 hours a day, 5 days a week. We learn an entire semester's worth of material in that period of time. It complements my learning style brilliantly, and my next block, which begins in late October, is Fiction Writing. It is also a double block, so I will be completely immersed in writing every day for seven weeks. I cannot wait—too often the distractions of college life prevent me from writing as often as I'd like to. I'm also working on a novel called Fortunes. It is about a girl who, as a 15 year old, was told by a psychic that she'd already met the man she was going to marry. The novel will follow her life from that point on, and how that information has shaped her both positively and negatively. It will essentially be a novel about the way someone interprets (and then manipulates) their fate.

Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Caitlin Barasch: Set aside twenty minutes a day for writing. It can be more, of course, and usually you will end up writing for longer. Treat it like a job. Writing is our job (and for some of us, our life). Disconnect from everything, grab a cup of coffee or soda or whatever will keep you going, maybe some chocolate, and just write. About anything. Usually you'll be surprised what comes out. Also, every day, write down something strange or interesting or shocking that happens. It can be about yourself, a friend, someone or something you saw on the street. It doesn't have to be in the format of a story—just write it down as an idea. As simple as "loud argument on the subway; woman with pink scarf" and then later, come back to it. The longer the list gets, the more potential story ideas you can come back to someday when you need a prompt!
 
 
Whatever you do, never give up! Sarah Spivack

Leodegraunce: Sarah, please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Sarah Spivack: I am a sophomore in high school, a band nerd, and an amateur tennis player.  Although I live in California, I am not a surfer girl; I spend most of my free time writing stories, and pestering my older brother.  My family members are my biggest fans, and they patiently edit my writing time and time again.

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Sarah Spivack: I discovered flash fiction about a year ago, and at the time, I didn’t like it.  I love to use adjectives, and flash fiction purposely limits the number you can use.  However, the more I read and wrote flash fiction, I began to recognize the art of telling a story concisely.  I have been trying to perfect that art ever since.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Sarah Spivack: I recently had one of my longer stories, "Behind the Glass," published in The MacGuffin.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for the remainder of 2012?

Sarah Spivack: As of now, I don’t have many strong plans for the rest of the year.  I write the stories as they come to me, and send them to magazines as I edit them.  Unfortunately, I hate to edit things, and I have a huuuuge stack to review.

Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Sarah Spivack: I’m willing to bet that every author has a bigger stack of rejection letters than accepted stories.  Whatever you do, never give up!


 
 
To just get the words down on paper (or the computer screen.)  Michelle Mccall

Leodegraunce: Please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Michelle Mccall: I was born and raised in Hawaii.  My main working background is in retail, though I also spent some time in the tourist industry as a photographer.  I'm self-employed, selling my arts and crafts online.

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Michelle Mccall: I started writing flash fiction this summer as a challenge to myself.  After years of focusing on novels, I wanted to see if I could write short again.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Michelle Mccall: "Invisible" is my first published work.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for the remainder of 2012?

Michelle Mccall: I have a novel manuscript that I am currently revising, and plan to participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) in November.

Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Michelle Mccall: To just get the words down on paper (or the computer screen.)  That's the first step, the most important step, but one that is so easy to ignore.  No one will ever know about the stories in your head if you don't write them down.
 
 

One writing tip would be to never pay to submit your work anywhere for any reason. Basil Rosa

Leodegraunce: Basil, please tell us about your background.

Basil Rosa: I published my first short story in 1980 under my birth name, John Flynn, and have been publishing stories and poems ever since. My web site is www.basilrosa.com. I began using the Basil Rosa pen name in 2010 when I realized yet another crisis of identity. I had become someone else, and was writing out of the experience of a person I no longer recognized. I know this may sound pretentious, but I wanted to get to know this new person. I took solace from the Portugese poet, Fernando Pessoa, who believed we are many people in our lifetimes, that the nature of our personalities is a fractured one. Pessoa wrote under three names, I believe. I connect with him and his work in a way that brings comfort and daily renewal. For me, writing is discovery. It is not therapy. It is not a career. My hope is always that my work entertains and inspires.

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction?
 
Basil Rosa: Flash fiction is relatively new as a form. And so am I. I've always written flash pieces, but it's only during the last three years that I have identified and tried to publish them as such. Sometimes, what was once a poem gets elongated into a flash piece. Sometimes a traditional short story gets boiled down to fit within flash parameters. I enjoy writing in all forms, love the different challenges and disciplines involved. I try to flow with them, so to speak. Life is a fluid experience, is it not?
 
Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Basil Rosa: I have a new traditional short story due out in the fall of 2012 from Vermont Literary Review. I've a jazz poem written for a sax-playing friend due out this summer from Ibbetson Street Press. I've also a trio of poems soon to appear in Umbrella on-line, www.umbrella.com. Each of these poems is named after a sea shell, but in the Latin name. Lastly, my first novel will be coming out some time in 2012 from Cervena Barva Press, www.cervenabarvapress.com. It's titled Heaven Is A City Where Your Language Isn't Spoken. I encourage your readers to check out Cervena Barva. Gloria Mindock is following through on her mission to publish and promote excellent voices from all corners of the globe.
 
Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for 2012?

Basil Rosa: My first few poetry books, and my first collection of short stories have been out of print for a while, so I plan on bringing them out in E-book format and making them available at my web site, and at all the more well-known outlets -- all for a very low price. I was in an airport not long ago and surprised by the amount of people I saw reading E-tablets. The future of E-publishing is here now. I'm working with an artist from Richmond on the cover of what was my first book of poems back in 1998, Moments Between Cities. That book earned an award from the Peace Corps. The press that published it went out of business. It's up to me now to make it available, so it will be out shortly as an E-book.
 
Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Basil Rosa: One writing tip would be to never pay to submit your work anywhere for any reason. Use your hard-earned chump change to buy another writer's book, or to subscribe to a magazine. I know it's difficult in our bordello culture, but try to be a writer not a whore. Learn a second language. Do your work quietly, steadily, with patience, and don't expect anything in the way of notoriety, respect, or money.
 
 
Persistence, Persistence, Persistence & perseverance.  I stopped saving my rejection slips last year.  I had 7 1/2 lbs of them. Thomas Michael McDade

Leodegraunce: Thomas, please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Thomas Michael McDade: I've been writing for forty-some years but I'm new to flash fiction unless you count prose poems.  I was drawn to the genre by the challenge of it I guess.  Ferragamos was a reduction of a 1,664 word short story.  I guess under 2,000 is flash in some minds. 

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for 2012?

Thomas Michael McDade: I plan to work on more flash fiction as well as some longer stories in the coming year.

Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Thomas Michael McDade: Persistence, Persistence, Persistence & perserverence.  I stopped saving my rejection slips last year.  I had 7 1/2 lbs of them.
 
 
Believe in yourself, but never be satisfied with your first draft.
Cath Barton

Leodegraunce: Cath, please tell Leodegraunce readers a bit about your background.

Cath Barton:  I’m a writer, photographer and singer. I’m English, but for the past six and a half years I’ve been living in Abergavenny, a lovely little town in South Wales.  I find it a very friendly and inspiring part of the world.

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Cath Barton: I started writing flash fiction just over two years ago. I was inspired by a friend who’d had a couple of 100-word stories published. I’m a member of a local writing group, and we all gave ourselves the challenge of writing stories of this length.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Cath Barton: Recently I’ve had a vignette called “I Want to go to Russia” published in Vine Leaves Literary Journal, and I recorded myself reading my story “On the Edge of the Sea Ice” for the online audio magazine 4’ 33”

Leodegraunce: What are some of your writing plans for 2012?

Cath Barton:  To write more and better stories, and to keep challenging myself to step outside my comfort zone.

Leodegraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Cath Barton: Believe in yourself, but never be satisfied with your first draft.