Farida Samerkhanova is a Canadian poet, short story and non-fiction writer who speaks Tatarian, Russian and English.  She is a graduate of Bashkir State University and is participating in a documentary film titled Her Choice – Hijab and Beyond the Dress Code, which is currently in production.

Never get discouraged. Keep writing if you cannot help writing, no matter how many rejections you get. Let life’s happiest moments, its challenging turns and its hardships become the source of your imagination and inspiration. Farida Samerkhanova

Leodegraunce: How long have you written flash fiction and what drew you to the genre?

Farida Samerkhanova: I discovered the flash fiction as a genre last year when Pilot announced its Short Story Contest. Flash rules keep you in narrow frames and make you express the essence laconically, which is not always easy. I love this genre. I rewrote some of my longer stories so that they do not exceed two hundred or two hundred and fifty words and I like rewritten pieces more than their longer version.

Leodegraunce: What are some of your recent works?

Farida Samerkhanova: Pilot Project named me a Grand Prize Winner. Unfortunately, I could not be present at the event when the winners got together and received their prizes because last fall on the very day when I received the envelope with the great news my Mom passed away. It was a shock to me. Emotionally I am still not normal, so big is the loss. I wrote a short poem about my Mom, which is a tribute to the memory of our Mother, Grandmother and Great Grandmother. I have hardly written anything else lately. My muse died. I am not sure how long my silence will last. They say that time cures…

Leodegraunce: Farida, we're sorry for your loss.  

Farida Samerkhanova: I am having a tough time now, but life goes on...

I plan to publish my first collection of poetry, which is close to its completion.

I have another project, a very vague one, but I keep thinking of it. Night Wolf Publications issued a very nice collection of Christmas stories, named A Yuletide Wish. It has a very uplifting spirit and I like it very much. However, life is not just joy and happiness. My idea is to make a collection of Christmas stories that are not necessarily upbeat. I have five pieces of poetry and prose that describe different people and situations on Christmas Eve. I have more in my mind.

Leodgraunce: What is your top writing tip for aspiring authors?

Farida Samerkhanova: Read classics. Classic English and American literature educated and inspired me all through my childhood and youth (I was raised in the Soviet Union behind the Iron Curtain). The best writing by the best authors helped me to master the English language, which is my third. No matter how experienced and established you are as a writer, you will definitely find many big and tiny treasures in the literary masterpieces of the past.

Proofread your work. Every time, before you submit, read the piece again and again. Pretend you are the Editor: change, improve, rewrite and make it better.

Never get discouraged. Keep writing if you cannot help writing, no matter how many rejections you get. Let life’s happiest moments, its challenging turns and its hardships become the source of your imagination and inspiration.
 


Comments


Your comment will be posted after it is approved.


Leave a Reply